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Washington State News Archive

Below are archived news items for the current month. To view a previous month, choose it from the list below.

"Nisqually tribe celebrates removal of dike, opening of estuary at ranch"--Longview Daily News - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Good news for fish. Chinnok salmon and wildlife will benefit from the wetlands resotration in the Nisqually Estuary. The Nisqually Tribe removed dikes that were holding back water from 140 acres of the Nisqually River delta. This project was the result of cooperation among the Tribe, a private land owner, and state agencies. - 11/01/2006

"Alcoholics finding way around ban" -- Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
After restricting the sale of cheap alcohol in Pioneer Square in 2003, Mayor Greg Nickels and City Council members petitioned the Washington State Liquor Control Board to expand the area where certain types of alcohol are banned. You can find the press release and resolution on the ban that went into effect yesterday from the Liquor Control Board. - 11/02/2006

"Senators: Online tax program not working" -- Olympian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Leaders of the Senate Finance Committee say a deal between the Internal Revenue Service and private tax preparers that allows people to submit returns by computer is too restrictive and discourages electronic filing. Sens. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and Max Baucus, D-Mont., said declines in participation in the Free File program show it is not working. You can read yesterday's release from the Senate Finance Committee. - 11/03/2006

"Floods threaten region; heavy rain, gusty winds expected today" -- Seattle Times
A powerful weekend storm that slammed Western Washington, triggering flood watches along local rivers, is expected to bring another two inches of rain today before the weather breaks Tuesday. Snohomish County Emergency Management officials said this morning that several Snohomish County rivers have hit flood levels but they have yet to take reports of major flooding. You can read Current Watches, Warnings and Advisories for Washington Issued by the National Weather Service updated every two minutes or access King County's Flood Warning System. - 11/06/2006

"B.C. smelter to appeal cleanup to high court "--Spokane Spokesman-Review - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Teck Cominco doesn't want to be held liable for cleaning up 150 miles of the Columbia River polluted by waste from its smelter in Nelson, British Columbia, and it's willing to take its case to the Supreme Court. On October 30 the U.S. Court of Appeals in Spokane refused to reconsider a July 3 ruling by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals that Teck Cominco was responsible for the cleanup under the Superfund program. The company argues that it did not "arrange" for heavy metals to be deposited in the United States; instead it was an "action of nature"--the river's current--that carried the pollution to the U.S. Lobbying lead to a voluntary agreement between the company and the Administration to study the extent of of the pollution. The state of Washington was less than thrilled with this agreement because it muddies the water on responsiblity for the cleanup. - 11/07/2006

"Estate tax stays; other initiatives still in the mix" -- Olympian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Washington voters were firmly rejecting Initiative 920's proposed repeal of the state estate tax Tuesday, upholding a tax on the wealthy that is earmarked for the state's public education system. I-920 was one of four statewide measures on the ballot: • I-933, the land-use rollback measure sponsored by the Farm Bureau, was defeated. • I-937, which mandates that certain large power utilities use a targeted amount of alternative energy supplies, was narrowly passing. It also requires utilities to do more energy conservation. • House Joint Resolution 4223, which increases the personal property exemption for individuals who run their own businesses to $15,000, was passing by a wide margin. The constitutional amendment raising the exemption from $3,000 had passed unanimously in the House and Senate. You can find all 2006 General Election Results through the Secretary of State's Office of Elections. - 11/08/2006

"State to review shredding of records--Legislators: Foster kids deserve to know past"--Spokane Spokesman-Review - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
(Registration may be required to read this article. State Library cardholders can access articles in back issues via ProQuest.) The Children's Administration is reconsidering its standard procedure of destroying records concerning foster children six years after they leave the foster care system. State Legislators have expressed concerns that the destruction of these records leaves foster care alumni without information about their medical care, schooling, foster parents, and, in some cases, siblings. The records are destroyed as space saving measure. Chapter 388-25 in the Washington Administrative Code lays out the foster care program in a question and answer format. - 11/08/2006

"Bush changes course on Rumsfeld What a big difference a week makes " -- Tacoma News Tribune - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
After years of defending his secretary of defense, President Bush announced Donald Rumsfeld’s resignation Wednesday within hours of the Democrats’ triumph in congressional elections. Bush reached back to his father’s administration to tap a former CIA director to run the Pentagon. The White House has posted the news conference for Robert Gates' nomination and a Fact Sheet: Dr. Robert M. Gates: The Right Choice for Secretary of Defense. - 11/09/2006

"11M[illion] Bottles of Acetaminophen Recalled"--Longview Daily News - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
The Food and Drug Administration has announced the recall of 11 million bottles of acetaminophen, an over the counter pain killer. Pieces of metal ranging from microdot size to a third of an inch long have been discovered in some of the pills. The pills are widely distributed, often as store brands. A list of the recalled batches can be found here. - 11/09/2006

"Education reform plan has objector"--Vancouver Columbian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Governor Christine Gregoire will be presenting the Washington Learns proposals for education reform around the state this week. The report and its proposals can be found here. Not everyone is impressed; Representative Glenn Anderson, a member of the Washington Learns steering committee, has prepared a minority report criticizing the recommendations. - 11/13/2006

"Washington governor wants scanners for B.C. border crossings"--Yakima Herald-Republic - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Governor Christine Gregoire is concerned about the effect the Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative will have on cross border tourism. This Initiative will require people have a passport to travel between the U.S. and Canada. The Governor is proposing that that border guards use a scanner to read the barcode on a drivers license as a way to verify a traveler's identity. The government of British Columbia has also stated its concerns about this regulation's effect on trade and tourism. - 11/13/2006

"State creates new beer commission to market microbrews" -- Olympian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
In Washington state, where the brewpub craze was launched two decades ago, craft brewers have created a new state-sanctioned commission to better market their ales to consumers. State lawmakers approved the commission during the last legislative session. Valoria Loveland, director of the state Department of Agriculture, announced its inaugural members Monday. - 11/15/2006

"Bishops adopt gay outreach guidelines" -- Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
The nation's Roman Catholic bishops adopted new guidelines for gay outreach Tuesday that are meant to be welcoming, while also telling gays to be celibate since the church considers their sexuality "disordered." You can find more information about the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops meeting and discussion on the guidelines through their Office of Media Relations. - 11/14/2006

"Medicare Part D enrollment period starts today"--Yakima Herald-Republic - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
The enrollment period for Medicaid Part D Prescription Drug Coverage plans has reopened. Washington's 840,000 Medicaid recipients can either join the program at this time or change prescription plan if they are already enrolled. The enrollment period will be open until January 1. The program is managed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Information about the program is also available in several different languages. - 11/15/2006

"Green policy set for a change: Democrats to press global warming" Spokane Spokesman-Review - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
(Registration may be required to read this article. State Library cardholders can access articles in back issues via ProQuest.) Congress' attitude toward environmental issues will change after the Democrats assume leadership of several key Congressional committees in January. Among the committees that will be friendlier to environmental interests are the Senate Environment & Public Works Committee, the House Committee on Resources, and the House Committee on Energy & Commerce. - 11/15/2006

"WSU study shows minimum wage hike does little to harm economy"--Vancouver Columbian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
A study done by Washington State University says that Washington's minimum wage law is an overall benefit to the state economy. The law ties mandatory raises in the minimum wage to inflation. The study says that although a few jobs may be lost as the minimum wage goes up, the vast majority of minimum wage workers are better off. Washington has the highest minimum wage in the nation. - 11/16/2006

"Transit report urges tolls, not taxes" -- Seattle Times
Tolls, other user fees and possibly public-private partnerships should be considered as ways to pay for the region's transportation needs, according to a newly appointed Regional Transportation Commission in a draft report released Wednesday. - 11/16/2006

"Sudan agrees to joint peacekeeping force" -- Tacoma News Tribune - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Sudan agreed in principle to a plan that will permit an international force to bolster African troops in Darfur, but almost immediately signaled it will be difficult to progress from an accord to real change in one of the world's bloodiest conflict zones. You can access the Highlights of the noon meeting on Darfur through the United Nations Archives. - 11/17/2006

"State report looks at Columbia River water supplies, demands"--Omak Chronicle - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Fresh water isn't an infinite resource so Washington state is trying to calculate all the demands on the Columbia River. The Department of Ecology has just issued The Columbia River Legislative Report" which has two major parts, "Columbia River Water Supply Inventory" and "Long-Term Water Supply and Demand Forecast". These parts will be updated on a regular basis. - 11/16/2006

"Presidents take over for Sacajawea"--Olympia Olympian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Buddy, can you spare a Nixon? The U.S. Mint has announced an annual program to issue four one dollar coins featuring U.S. Presidents. Each President, except those still alive, will be honored in turn, starting in 2007. It is expected that the coins will be prized by collectors and accepted by vending machines. The Mint has published a press release with the schedule for issuing the coins. - 11/20/2006

"Wash[ington] doesn't require crane operator certification, inspections"--Vancouver Columbian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Crane operators don't need special certification in Washington state. This fact emerged after the fatal collapse of a construction crane in Bellevue. A list of occupations and businesses that require special certification can be found at the Department of Licensing. - 11/20/2006

"Connecting parents and teachers: With dozens of languages in district, translators are key"--Spokane Spokesman-Review - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
(Registration may be required to read this article. State Library cardholders can access articles in back issues via ProQuest.) When a city like Spokane has an immigrant community, it can lead to the need for bilingual programs in the schools. Spokane has over 900 students from all over the world who are still learning English. The Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction supports bilingual and migrant language programs. The U.S. Department of Education also supports such programs through the Office of English Language Acquistion. - 11/21/2006

"Flooding's toll on national parks and forests: $50M[illion]"--Seattle Times
The rain keeps coming and coming, washing away roads and popular campgrounds in National Parks and forests. It is estimated that over $50 million in flood damage has occurred in Mount Rainier National Park, Olympic National Park, and the North Cascades National Park Complex due to the heavy rainfall this month. This damage may limit activites in these areas next year. - 11/22/2006

"4 out of 10 U.S. births out of wedlock"--Pasco Tri-City Herald - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Fewer unmarried teenage girls are having children, but more unmarried women in their 20s are according to "Births: Preliminary Data for 2005", a new study issued by the National Center for Health Statistics. - 11/22/2006

"King County can't keep troopers: Tough duty, cost of living help drive 'revolving door' of exiting veterans"--Seattle Post-Intelligencer
The Washington State Patrol is having a difficult time keeping experienced troopers in the King County area. The high cost of living and a heavy work load are incentives for veteran officers to transfer to other parts of the state. - 11/27/2006

"Storms hamper holiday travel, cause outages in Washington state"--Tacoma News Tribune - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Winter came to Washington--on Thanksgiving weekend. Weather alerts and travel alerts have piled up across the state like a malevolent snow drift. It's not a good time to drive across the Cascade passes. - 11/27/2006

"DOE mulls burial grounds cleanup"--Pasco Tri-City Herald - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Some of the earliest radioactive waste storage sites at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation are among the least understood. Low level radioactive waste might be in the same trench as high level radioactive waste. Maps of the waste sites are often inaccurate so first the Department of Energy is undertaking the project to find the trenches and then study them before cleaning them up. It could be 2024 before they're cleaned up. - 11/26/2006

"Judge orders currency altered to aid the blind"--Olympia Olympian - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
Perhaps different denominations of American paper currency will come in different sizes or each denomination will have a distinctive feel. A Federal judge has ordered the Treasury Department to come up with ways for people with visual impairments to tell bills apart. The case is American Society for the Blind et al. vs. Henry M. Paulson, Jr., Secretary of the Treasury. - 11/29/2006

"Today's Spokane's 125th anniversary"--Spokane Spokesman-Review - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
(Registration may be required to read this article. State Library cardholders can access articles in back issues via ProQuest.) Spokane--or Spokan Falls, as it was then known--was incorporated on November 29, 1881. Christmas was good that year. The town soon became a tourist destination. Today's industries include making time capsules. - 11/29/2006

"State Parks Commission considers adoption of Ice Age Floods interpretive plan"-- - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
The Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission is holding a series of meetings on whether to create a series of sites and programs on the ice age floods that shaped such landmarks as Grand Coulee, Dry Falls, and Palouse Falls. The ice age flood sites are part of the Parks and Recreation Commission's State Parks Centennial 2013 Plan for adding and maintaining park sites. - 11/29/2006

"Bush agrees to speedy turnover in Iraq"--Seattle Post-Intelligencer - Please Ask a Librarian for a copy of this article.
President Bush meet with Iraqi Prime Minister in Amman, Jordan to discuss the situation in Iraq. The White House has released a transcript of their statements at their "joint press availability". Meanwhile the report of the Iraq Study Group is awaited with great anticipation. The Congressional Research Service recently updated its report on "Iraq: Elections, Government, and Constitution". - 11/30/2006


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